Last edited by Malamuro
Thursday, April 23, 2020 | History

5 edition of Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors found in the catalog.

Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors

First International Symposium on Endothelium-Derived Vasoactive Factors, Philadelphia, Pa., May 1989

by Gabor M. Rubanyi

  • 6 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by S Karger Pub .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Nitric oxide,
  • Cardiovascular System Physiology,
  • physiology,
  • Physiological effect,
  • Cardiovascular medicine,
  • Paediatric medicine,
  • Congresses,
  • Endothelium, Vascular,
  • Endothelium-Derived Relaxing F,
  • Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factor

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsPaul M. Vanhoutte (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages348
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8938086M
    ISBN 10380555091X
    ISBN 109783805550918

    Chapter Endothelium as a Target of the Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Disease. Scott Kinlay, Andrew P. Selwyn, and Peter Ganz. Chapter Oxidant Stress and Endothelial Function in Patients with Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis. Mark A. Creager. Chapter Endothelium-Derived Nitric Oxide: An Antiatherogenic Molecule. Role of Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) in Atherosclerosis. current evidence suggests that LPC impairs the endothelium-dependent relaxations mediated by endothelium-derived relaxing factors and directly modulates contractile responses in vascular smooth muscle. However, despite all this, and although elevated levels of LPC have been linked to. The endothelium produces endothelium-derived relaxing factors such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin, which help maintain a nonthrombogenic surface through inhibition of platelet aggregation and promotion of platelet disaggregation. 1 .


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Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors by Gabor M. Rubanyi Download PDF EPUB FB2

Kirk P. Conrad, S. Ananth Karumanchi, in Seldin and Giebisch's The Kidney (Fifth Edition), Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors. Endothelium-derived relaxing factors including vasodilatory prostaglandins (PGs) and NO have been hypothesized to mediate the gestational increases of ERPF and GFR.

The potential intermediary role of PGs has been investigated in. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) is a name for a substance Robert F. Furchgott discovered had the eponymous properties.

Today, it is firmly established this substance is nitric oxide (NO). Endothelium produces NO which then diffuses to the vascular smooth muscle tissue, although there seems to be evidence that vasodilation may also be of neuronal origin, rather Enzyme (inhibitors): NOSnNOS, 3-Bromo-7.

Endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), first discovered by Furchgott and Zawadzki in [1], was subsequently shown by Ignarro and colleagues [2] and Moncada and colleagues [3], independently, to be NO.

Its discovery as a cardiovascular signaling molecule led. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) is an endogenous vasodilator that endothelial cells produce and subsequently release in response to various changes in normal physiologic as well as pathophysiologic changes.

EDRF causes vascular smooth muscle to relax, as it activates soluble guanylate cyclase and subsequently increases cyclic guanylate Author: Yasaman Pirahanchi, Kristen N.

Brown. ISBN: OCLC Number: Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. [S.l.]: HathiTrust Digital Library, MiAaHDL. Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors: 1st International Symposium on Endothelium-Derived Vasoactive Factors, Philadelphia, May [Rubanyi, G.M., Vanhoutte, P.M.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors: 1st International Symposium on Endothelium-Derived Vasoactive FactorsFormat: Hardcover.

However, if you really wish to do this, the article would have to be called 'Endothelium-derived relaxing factors' (emphasis on plural), since you've already pointed out that there is more than one EDRF. In citing EDHF, you do make a good point though about whether this article should describe the other known relaxing factors.

Buy Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors: 1st International Symposium on Endothelium-Derived Vasoactive Factors, Philadelphia, May Read Books Reviews - ce: $ Endothelial cells in culture and production of endothelium-derived constricting factors.

In: Relaxing and Contracting Factors: Biological and Clinical Research, edited by P. Vanhoutte. Clifton, NJ: Humana,p. – CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: The endothelium, a monolayer of endothelial cells, constitutes the inner cellular lining of the blood vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) and the lymphatic system, and therefore is in direct contact with the blood/lymph and the circulating cells.

The endothelium is a major player in the control of blood fluidity, platelet aggregation and vascular tone, a major actor in the regulation. Abstract. The phenomenon of endothelium-dependent relaxation, first described in detail by Furchgott and colleagues (Furchgott and Zawadzki, ), has now been demonstrated in a wide range of blood vessels from a variety of species studied, including human (for reviews, see Furchgott, ; Griffith et al., a; Busse et al., ).Cited by: The book is divided into four parts: Part I reviews the endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRF), prostacyclin (PGI 2), the endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCF), neurohumoral substances, and the endothelins.

Part II discusses the significance of the endotheliumderived vasoactive factors in the control of blood flow through the Author: Per-Otto Hagen. Book Description. First published in The Endothelium: Modulator of Cardiovascular Function takes a comprehensive look at the role of the endothelium in cardiovascular control in health and disease.

Experts offer detailed reviews on specific topics that address these roles of the endothelium: diffusion barrier, blood-brain barrier, regulator of capillary permeability.

Shortly afterward it became clear that nitric oxide had important functions in the regulation of vascular tone, and it was demonstrated that nitric oxide was identical to endothelium-derived relaxing factor, a factor derived from endothelial cells.

The Endothelium: Modulator of Cardiovascular Function takes a comprehensive look at the role of the endothelium in cardiovascular control in health and disease. Experts offer detailed reviews on specific topics that address these roles of the endothelium: diffusion barrier, blood-brain barrier, regulator of capillary permeability, metabolic function (uptake and enzymatic destruction.

It is an exciting task to be the editor of the first monograph covering a new area of the biomedical sciences. Since the first report in by Robert Furchgott and colleagues (see Chapter 1) of the evidence of endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated Price: $ It is an exciting task to be the editor of the first monograph covering a new area of the biomedical sciences.

Since the first report in by Robert Furchgott and colleagues (see Chapter 1) of the evidence of endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated arteries, there are ever­ increasing numbers of vascular physiologists and pharmacologists who are scraping away the Brand: Humana Press.

effect of the solution on the individual endothelium-derived relaxing factors (nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor) must be distinguished. Third, the effect of each major component of the solution should be investigated.

Lastly, the effect of a variety of new additives in the solution may be studied. Request PDF | Endothelium-Derived Factors | The endothelium-dependent regulation of vascular tone is predominantly by four major players: nitric oxide (NO Author: Yuansheng Gao.

Endothelium-derived relaxing factor Nitric Oxide, the multi-layer structure of an arterial wall, and kinetic-diffusion processes are taken into consideration. The limit case of the thin-wall.

Summary First published in The Endothelium: Modulator of Cardiovascular Function takes a comprehensive look at the role of the endothelium in cardiovascular control in health and disease.

Experts offer detailed reviews on specific topics that address these roles of the endothelium: diffusion barrier, blood-brain barrier, regulator of capillary permeability, metabolic.

First, the overall effect on endothelium should be identified. Second, the effect of the solution on the individual endothelium-derived relaxing factors (nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor) must be distinguished. Third, the effect of each major component of the solution should be by: These include vasodilators, such as prostacyclin and endothelium-derived relaxing factor (which is now known to be nitric oxide), and vasoconstrictors, such as angiotensin II and endothelin.

These factors are released by the endothelium in response to humoral and hemodynamic stimuli, and they play a major role in local regulation of vascular : John P. Cooke. Rubanyi GM, Vanhoutte PM, Superoxide anions and hyperoxia inactivate endothelium-derived relaxing factors, Am J Physiol, ;H–H Furchgott RF, Studies on relaxation of rabbit aorta by sodium nitrite: the basis for the proposal that acid-activatable inhibitory factor from bovine retractor penis is inorganic nitrite and the Author: Paul M Vanhoutte.

Introduction. Endothelium has been described to present key roles in the vascular physiology: various endothelium-derived endogenous substances [], namely contracting (endothelin, prostaglandin F2a and thromboxane A2) and/or relaxing (prostaglandin I2 and nitric oxide, NO) factors [2, 3] can modulate blood vessel substances, known as endothelium Author: Joana Sousa, Carmen Diniz.

Endothelium-derived relaxing factors Since the initial observation that an intact endothelium is necessary for acetylcholine-induced vasodilation,13 many physiological stimuli have been shown to cause vasodilation by stimulating the release of powerful vasodilators such as endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), nitric oxide, prostacyclin.

In healthy endothelial tissues, a balance between endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRFs) and endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCFs) is maintained.

Endothelial dysfunction disturbs this balance. Several vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive factors regulate this balance. The endothelium secretes a number of vasodilator factors Author: Indranil Biswas, Gausal A.

Khan. Inhe found that a physiological concentration of hydrogen peroxide derived from the endothelium is an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), 8 relaxing underlying vascular smooth muscle by opening potassium channels, with its importance increasing as vessel size decreases.

9 The identification of hydrogen peroxide as an EDHF. Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors � A Focus on Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor(s). Can J Physiol Pharmacol.*Ding H. & C.R. Triggle. Novel Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors: Identification Of Factors And Cellular Targets.

Pharmacol. & Toxicol. Methods. Ding H., P. Kubes and C.R. Start studying The Kidney: Introduction, GFR, and Tubular Transport. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

Do endothelium-derived relaxing factors effect efferent or afferent areterioles more. 1 immuno book questions. 17 terms. Summer immunology chapter 1. THIS SET IS OFTEN IN FOLDERS WITH. Endothelium regulates local vascular tone by means of releasing relaxing and contracting factors, of which the latter have been found to be elevated in vascular pathogenesis of hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and by:   Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Gabor M Rubanyi books online.

Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. Endothelium-Derived Relaxing Factors. Gabor M. Rubanyi. 18 May Hardback.

unavailable. Notify me. Abstract: Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium– dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium–derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium–derived.

Therefore, the present review aims to summarize previous published vasculature-related studies and provide an overall depiction of each pathway including endothelium-derived relaxing factors, G-protein-coupled, enzyme-linked, and channel-linked receptors that occurred in the microenvironment of vasculature with a full schematic diagram on the Cited by: 8.

In the early s, after having established that the endothelium played a surprisingly active role our vascular system, researchers Robert F. Furchgott and Louis J. Ignarro sought what was called the EDRF, or the “endothelium-derived relaxing factor,” an unknown signaling mechanism through which the endothelium could communicate with and.

The biologically active molecule nitric oxide (NO) is a simple, membrane-permeable gas with unique chemistry. It is formed by the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, with the release of enzymatic oxidation of L-arginine to L-citrulline takes place in the presence of oxygen and NADPH using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), flavin mononucleotide (FMN), heme, thiol.

Vasorelaxant effects of EOAZ were totally abolished by mechanical removal of the endothelium, suggesting that they are dependent upon released endothelium-derived relaxant factors such as nitric oxide (NO), [2] and/or endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF).

The pioneering experiments of Furchgott and Zawadzki first demonstrated an endothelium-derived relaxing factor that was subsequently shown to be nitric oxide (NO). 5 NO is generated from L-arginine by the action of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in the presence of cofactors such as tetrahydrobiopterin.

6 This gas diffuses to the vascular smooth Cited by: Under physiological conditions, endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors are balanced, so that vascular homeostasis is maintained marginally in favour of vasodilation.

In addition to changes in cell morphology, EC respond to defined flow stimuli instantaneously with electrochemical activities and gene expression [ 40, 41 ].Cited by:. Abstract. Although the available information is limited, a survey of the literature concerning the effect of ageing on endothelium-dependent responses in animal blood vessels suggests that the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors (nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor) is reduced, whereas that of endothelium-derived Cited by: The venous intima is composed of a nonthrombogenic endothelium that produces endothelium-derived relaxing factors such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin.

C. Venous valves close in response to caudal-to-cephalad blood flow at a velocity of at least 30 cm/s 2.Circulation Research, ISSN11/, VolumeIs pp. -